Faculty and Student Blog

 

The editorial team of the WCIDJ along with WCIU faculty, students and guest bloggers regularly blog on key issues in international development, analyzing the spiritual, historical and other root causes of many problems around the world. This blog is intended to provide a space for continued dialogue about many of the issues that are discussed in the WCIDJ and its scholarly forum. Check here regularly for interesting posts, as well as information about upcoming issues and events in this field.

We welcome guest posts from students and experts in the field of international development! If you would like to contribute to the blog, email us.

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Book Title: Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning
Authors: Peter C. Brown, Henry L. Roediger III, Mark A. McDaniel
Publisher: The Belknap Press of Harvard University, London, 2014, 313 pages, $29.00

This book is by far the most helpful book I have ever read in relation to learning how to learn.

The authors make the following claims: (1) learning is deeper and more durable when it is effortful, (2) we are poor judges of when we are learning well, (3) retrieval practice (recalling facts or concepts or events from memory) is a more effective learning strategy than review by rereading, (4) periodic practice stops forgetting, (5) interleaving the practice of two or more subjects makes retrieval harder but produces longer-lasting learning, (6) trying to solve a problem before being taught the solution leads to better learning, (7) you build better mastery when you use testing as a tool to identify your areas of weakness, (8) making mistakes and correcting them leads to advanced learning.

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Studies by husband and wife researchers at MIT and the University of Massachusetts (now at Harvard) may help explain a link between autism and severe infection during pregnancy, the MIT News reports.

Bacterial populations in the mother’s GI tract may play a central role. The research finds that mothers who experience an infection severe enough to require hospitalization during pregnancy are at higher risk of having a child with autism.

A 2010 study that included all children born in Denmark between 1980 and 2005 found that severe viral infections during the first trimester of pregnancy translated to a threefold risk for autism, and serious bacterial infections during the second trimester were linked with a 1.42-fold increase in risk. These infections included influenza, viral gastroenteritis, and severe urinary tract infections.

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Is it possible to engineer the end of malaria? The Intellectual Ventures Lab thinks so. In response to the lack of trained and experienced malaria microscopists, the innovative lab proposes that computers can be trained to recognize malaria parasites. This would provide the opportunity to identify the disease in blood samples at a rapid pace, stopping the disease before it becomes deadly.

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“If you are neutral in situations of injustices, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” – Desmond Tutu

In response to the racist violence in Charlottesville VA recently and the racist profiling and cruelty of the recently-pardoned Arizona sherrif, I can only be appalled. After decades of progress with laws prohibiting racial discrimination I have to conclude that our country just proved that “you can’t legislate morality.” Although, as Martin Luther King Jr. said, “It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me but it can keep him from lynching me and I think that is pretty important.”

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Here are some of the names that come to my mind when I think about some of the women who have inspired me with their impact in the field of International Development …

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What are some of the ways that you can adapt crowd sourcing in what you do?

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Evangelicals around the globe have rejoiced over the burgeoning of the Chinese House Church movement over the past several decades. This case study gives us a better perspective on some of the significant issues in China from an evangelical perspective.

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The National Institute of Malaria Research (NIMR) has found two new species of Anopheles Stephensi (urban vector) and Anopheles Culicifacies (rural vector) circulating this year in New Delhi.

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After the Messiah came, and dealt with the heaped up sin of the world, thus “destroying,” or “undoing” the works of the devil (1 John 3:8), creation was still left groaning under the burden of what Satan had done to it. Just as God subjected the people of Israel to the frustration of knowing what is right (through the Law) and not being able to fulfill it, so creation has been subjected to the frustration of “knowing” what it is meant to be and not being able to be that. The author of First John envisions the world as being in need of rescue from the hold the evil one has upon it: “the whole world lies in the [power of] the evil one” (1 John 5:19). He seems to allude (in 1 John 2:13, 14) to the need for strong champions, in the tradition of Heracles, to overcome evil wherever it is found and contribute toward the final cosmic overthrow of Satan.

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The need for international development exists because societies and their land are in chaos to one degree or another. In Isaiah 32 societal chaos is being overcome by the intervention of God’s Spirit. In this chapter we see a metaphorical image of the consequences for societies whose people practice ungodliness, who use wicked schemes to leave the hungry empty, and who destroy the poor with their lies: “The fortress will be abandoned, the noisy city deserted; citadel and watchtower will become a wasteland forever” (Isa. 32:14). Destruction and desolation are inherent in a person or society rebelling against God.

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Call for Papers

Mar 02, 2016

William Carey International Development Journal invites scholarly papers on the theme “Children and International Development” for its Spring 2016 issue. William Carey International Development Journal is the bi-annual online journal from William Carey International University, devoted to interdisciplinary research focused identifying and addressing on the historical, cultural, and spiritual roots of human problems around the world.

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By Mark Mihalyov, WCIU MA Student

The rise of radical Islamic terrorism has destroyed communities and displaced millions of people. These people are now cut off from that which is familiar and formed the fabric and foundation of society for them. Their entrance into the world of other cultures has brought a significant measure of (misplaced?) fear and hysteria. Ironically, the “Christian” culture they are now exposed to is in many ways reminiscent of that of the middle ages; more focused on forms and traditions than on power and passion for missionary service.

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As a description of the consequences of opposition to God’s ways, the figure of speech, tohu wabohu, also contains within itself the solution to addressing the root problem behind the chaos and desolation. Believers have the privilege of allowing God’s Spirit to work through them to demonstrate God’s glory, by bringing order out of chaos, and by overcoming evil with good (Hebrew, tob, a word play with the similar- sounding tohu). The rest of the Bible explains how to overcome and/or avoid tohu at various levels (physical, personal, family, social, political) or it shows what happens when tohu is not overcome. (The observable chaotic result can then be called tohu wabohu.) In Genesis 1, physical chaos is being overcome by God’s good creation.

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The account in Genesis 1 of God’s making the land helped the people of Israel see themselves as a community of the people of God, about to inherit a land made for them by God. The author of the creation passage certainly knew how to get his readers’ and listeners’ attention. The grammar of Genesis 1:2 places a strong emphasis on “the land” by placing the noun before the verb, which is not usual in Hebrew: we’ha’eretz hayeta, “now the earth was ...”. Allen Ross asks, “Why did the new nation of Israel need to have this material and to have it written as it is?”

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How can we design WCIU to empower NGOs to be contextualized to the increasingly urban world, to help societies become more & more aligned physically, socially, & spiritually?

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In studying the book of Colossians, some of us had the insight that each cultural group, including yet-unreached peoples, is able to apprehend something about Christ that other groups are not able to see. To me this is what it means in Rev. 5:9 that some from every tribe and tongue and nation are worshiping God around his throne

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